Portrait Of A Fisherman

P1000665

 
Portrait Of A Fisherman
Upon a blue water canvas we paint our lives
The ebb and swell of the ocean rhythms compose our musical score
Toiling midst the waves sculpts our bodies and our minds
The seascape influences a fisherman’s outlook
Shapes our palette and perspective
Upon a blue water canvas we paint our lives
There is a timeless symmetry to fishing
Previous generations plied these same waters
Toiling midst the waves sculpted their bodies and their minds
Whether born to or brought to fishing
Those who remain are tied to a hard working legacy
Upon a blue water canvas we’ve all painted our lives
The sea never leaves us
On the water or not, it is the focus of our anchoring gaze
Toiling midst the waves has sculpted our bodies and our minds
They say every painter paints himself
When we reach the vanishing point may we find a masterpiece
Toiling midst the waves sculpted our bodies and our minds
Upon a blue water canvas we painted our lives
 

Here is the story behind Portrait Of A Fisherman. While I love to read and write poetry, I have little knowledge regarding the anatomy of its various forms. I simply know what sounds good to my ear.

A while back a friend shared a Facebook quiz. I generally scroll past these things, but this one intrigued me. It challenged Which Poetic Form Are You? I took the quiz, got my answer (long forgotten now) and was assured it was a great thing to be. My curiosity piqued, I investigated other forms by retaking the quiz numerous times, randomly picking pictures, repeatedly being assured that each form was a great thing to be. None said anything such as, “Ooh, sorry, you are a mere Haiku.”

One of the forms was Villanelle. I wondered whether this pertained to evil as in villain or fancy living quarters as in villa. My journey of study began and culminated in Portrait Of A Fisherman.

A villanelle is a French poem with a stinkin lot of rules. It consists of 19 lines. Five sets of three lines (tercets), and a final set of four lines (quatrain). The first line is repeated as the last line of every other tercet and the final line of the poem. The last line of the first tercet is repeated as the last line of the other every other tercet and the second to the last line of the poem. These repeated lines can be tweaked a little when repeated, but not changed completely.

Oh, and the whole thing is suppose to rhyme. Good grief. It was grueling enough coming up with lines suitable for repetition. I write for pleasure, not penance, so I ended up with a non-rhyming Villanelle.  Hope you enjoyed.

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2 thoughts on “Portrait Of A Fisherman

    • Thanks. That comment means a lot. I really have fun with it all. Glad others are amused as well. I mainly get lucky with photos. More in the right place at the right time than good photography skills. Captured this one at high water pick-up on a beautiful evening. Was calm enough we were able to nose in with the skiff and drop me ashore to run Fergie (our tractor) and handle the lines while my buds picked up the net.

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